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Florida Construction Law News

25FEB 2018

Don’t Plead Your Pass-Through CD Claims Out of Coverage

by Ryan M. Charlson, Esq.

Failing to plead damage to other property, even in the face of record evidence supporting damage to other property, can result in a ruling that there is no duty to defend. In Florida, a commercial general liability (“CGL”) insurer’s duty to defend its insured is determined by examining whether the allegations in the complaint against Read More…

24JAN 2018

Construction Trial Success

by Daniel E. Levin, Esq.

We are pleased to congratulate Dan Levin and George Truitt on a very successful verdict in a three (3) week construction defect jury trial in Miami. The Plaintiff, a luxury high rise condominium association in the Williams Island section of Aventura, brought suit against the General Contractor and CSK’s client, a high performance coating applicator, Read More…

14JAN 2018

The Burden of Betterment

by Ryan M. Charlson, Esq.

The concept of betterment has long been used by defendants in cases involving defective design or construction to limit the damages awarded to a plaintiff.[1] The theory behind betterment is that: “if in [the] course of making repairs [an] owner adopts a more expensive design, recovery should be limited to what would have been the reasonable cost of repair according to original design.”[2] Betterment is often raised as an affirmative defense, requiring a defendant to prove that the plaintiff has received a good or service that is superior to that for which the plaintiff originally contracted. A recent South Florida case seems, at first blush, to suggest the burden of establishing the value of betterments may fall to the plaintiff, although a closer reading indicates the decision is likely to have limited applicability.

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15DEC 2017

Altman Contractors, Inc. v. Crum & Forster Specialty Ins. Co.

by John A. Chiocca, Esq.

The Florida Supreme Court issued its opinion in Altman Contractors, Inc. v. Crum & Forster Specialty Ins. Co., Case No., SC16-1420, which answered the following certified question from the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit: Is the notice and repair process set forth in Chapter 558 of the Florida Statutes a “suit’” Read More…

16OCT 2017

Certain Contractor Regulations Suspended Following Hurricane Irma

by Rochelle B. Chiocca, Esq.

Due to the damage caused by Hurricane Irma, and as directed by Governor Rick Scott’s Executive Order 17-245, the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (“DBPR”) issued an Emergency Order, Order 2017-07396, on September 15, 2017, relaxing certain regulations in the thirty-seven Florida counties that are listed in FEMA’s Disaster Declaration DR-4337.  DBPR’s secretary, Read More…

19SEP 2017

Understanding Alabama’s Statutes of Limitations and Repose for Construction Projects

by Clay H. Whittaker, Esq.

Alabama’s statutes of limitations and repose are alive and well! Cole, Scott & Kissane, P.A. (“CSK”) recently prevailed on a Motion for Summary Judgment—and in defending the plaintiff’s subsequent appeal to the Supreme Court of Alabama—arguing that the plaintiff’s (an Association) lawsuit against a construction subcontractor was barred as untimely under both of Alabama’s statute of limitations and statute of repose.

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25AUG 2017

Retroactive Application of a Construction Subcontract Containing a Merger Clause? Florida’s Fifth District Court of Appeal Answers in the Affirmative

by Sanjo S. Shatley, Esq.

Florida’s Fifth District Court of Appeal recently addressed the issue of retroactive application of a construction subcontract on the basis of a merger clause in Don Facciobene, Inc. v. Hough Roofing, Inc.[1] In the case, in late 2010, Don Facciobene, Inc. (“DFI”), a licensed general contractor, contracted with Digiacinto Holdings, LLC, an owner of a Read More…

04AUG 2017

Survival of the Independent Tort Doctrine after the Florida Supreme Court’s Limitation of the Economic Loss Rule

by Ryan M. Charlson, Esq.

The independent tort doctrine is a prohibition against tort actions that are calculated to recover solely economic damages for one in contractual privity with another. In other words, the doctrine is intended to prevent parties to a contract from circumventing the allocation of losses set forth in a contract by bringing an action for economic loss in tort.

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10JUL 2017

Latest Blower Door Regulations Now Effective

by Ryan M. Charlson, Esq.

As part of Florida’s increasing efforts to achieve energy efficiency in new construction, changes have been made to the methodology of measuring dwelling air leakage and tolerable measurements. In June 2015, the Florida Legislature amended Section 553.998, Florida Statutes, to require additional testing for newly constructed buildings to verify air leakage figures. Residential construction must now undergo a Mandatory Residential Air Infiltration (“Blower Door”) Test. Florida companies were granted a two-year “grace period” to allow the construction industry to prepare and plan for the changes, which became effective on July 1, 2017.

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22JUN 2017

Florida’s Third District Court of Appeal Suggests Negligent Repairs to Real Property Are Not Subject to the Statute of Repose

by Nicole Rodolico, Esq.

Florida’s Third District Court of Appeal (“Third District”) recently addressed the applicable statute of limitations for repairs under Section 95.11, Florida Statutes, including the issue of whether a repair constitutes an improvement to real property. In Companion Property & Casualty Group v. Built Tops Building Services, Inc., No. 3D16-2044, 2017 Fla. App. LEXIS 6584 (Fla. Read More…