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Monthly Archives: March 2016

07MAR 2016

Failing to plead damage to other property, even in the face of record evidence supporting damage to other property, can result in a ruling that there is no duty to defend.

In Florida, a commercial general liability (“CGL”) insurer’s duty to defend its insured is determined by examining whether the allegations in the complaint against the insured allege conduct and resulting damage contemplated in the subject policy.[1] This is so even if the allegations in the complaint against the insured are factually incorrect or without merit.[2] Generally, post-1986 CGL policies do not provide coverage to insureds in construction defect matters unless the complaint states: 1) the insured neither intended, nor expected, the damage; and 2) the contractor’s faulty work caused damage to completed, otherwise non-defective work.[3] Recently, in Core Construction Services, Inc. v. Crum & Forster Specialty Insurance Company,[4] the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida addressed the issue of whether an insurer has a duty to defend its insured when there is record evidence of damage to other property, but when the operative pleading failed to set forth an allegation of such damages.

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